More on Grammar and Use of Words

Better be a fool for a while than to be a fool for ever. If in doubt check it out. Again, this is not another grammar lesson. It’s just sharing of another lesson learnt. What else is writing, if not about sharing your knowledge, your thoughts, and your feelings?

It can never be overemphasized. Every word counts in writing. It is the words you put on paper that are the building blocks of what you want to present to the reader. Correct use of words and grammar are the lifeblood of your writing. Together they constitute the vehicle of communication between you and your reader. If any of them is misplaced or inappropriately structured you can guess where your well researched piece might end up.

It is not uncommon that you will come across two words with similar connotations that may be easily mixed up; and mess up everything. Will you be able at the first go to make the difference between them? That’s where I want to come up with this post. Hats off if you’re an expert. Everybody isn’t. Be careful. It’s always good to check whether the vehicle is actually conveying what you wanted to.

In my last post I hinted at some words in common use that can spoil your writing if you don’t pay heed. Those are not the only ones. There’s a lot more; we can’t spot them all at a time. As we go along, others surface up; they’re important enough to stop and ponder upon.

Catching up with my reading of some familiar blogs, especially those that focus on writing and tips about writing, I picked up another set of such words – Dissatisfied, Unsatisfied from Daily Writing Tips. Can you see the difference? Not alien words, are they? Take a peek and see for yourself. I still remember in one of the courses I followed about the theories of motivation I was at a loss whenever I encountered these words. Each time I had to stop for a while to make sure I had the right message. Funny, isn’t it?

The use of verb moods is another area that deserves we stopped by. The mood you use will indicate how you are expressing your thoughts. You’ll find useful tips and explanations about the four moods – indicative, imperative, subjunctive and infinitive – at English Grammar 101: Verb Mood. It’s a simple, practical and straightforward guide for beginners and perhaps a refresher for those who are still experiencing difficulty at some stage or other.

So the next time you write remember that no words or verb moods can be taken for granted. If you have other examples of grammar and word use, do share it here.

Contributor/Journalist,
Occupational Safety & Health Management Professional,
Personnel Management & Industrial Relations Professional,
Blogger, and Retired Civil Servant.
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